Who gets the blame?

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  • #2190

    Bob23108
    Participant

    Do African Americans believe, as their spokesperson Rev. Jesse Jackson represents, that the majority of problems facing African Americans today continue to be caused by the white man or do they believe they control the majority of their own destinies?

    User Detail :  

    Name : Bob23108, City : Pomona, State : CA Country : United States, 
    #15482

    Gary
    Member

    Fist of all, Black people have not appointed Jesse Jackson as the spokes person for Black america. In fact, most blacks, myself included, are terribly embarassed by Jackson, Sharpton, Farrakahn, etc… I and most Black americans I know feel that we control our own destiny. However, white americans create greater obstacles for us than we would otherwise have to endure.

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    Name : Gary, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Jewish, Age : 37, City : Los Angeles, State : CA Country : United States, Occupation : Professional, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, 
    #27941

    Shawn
    Member

    Bob, First of all, Rev. Jackson is not ‘the’ spokesperson for the Afro-American race, he is one of many visible and vocal leaders/spokesperson of our day. So, you can include General Colin Powell, Cornell West, Kwiesi Mfume, Oprah Winfrey, Min. Louis Farakhan, as well as others in the ranks of those who embody the voices and thoughts of our race. Rev. Jackson’s contribution to our race, as well as our society as a whole can’t be overlooked or diminished in any way. Rev. Jackson is gifted in the area of mediation, and has a special knack for drawing the media’s attention to vital issue of the day, one of which happens to be racial inequalities. Now, to answer your question directly, I don’t think we as Afro-Americans blame the ‘White Man’ for our every woe. We blame the ‘System’ set in place by the majority (Whites), that does not allow for equal treatment for all races. We can not deny we live in a society that systematically discriminates in housing, education, media, products & services, and employment. There have been countless stories done on 20/20 , 60 Minutes, and other news programs, that document the disparate treatment toward people of color. It has been imbedded in the psyche of our nation, whether it be on a conscious or subconscious level. Inspite of popular opinion, we aren’t asking for hand-outs or a free ride, but all we seek is an equal opportunity to create better lives for ourselves in every facet of our society. If I don’t diligantly seek after those things, then I am to blame.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Shawn, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Baptist, Age : 31, City : Baltimore, State : MD Country : United States, Occupation : MIS Programmer/PC Specialist, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #42226

    Mandi
    Member

    There are so many things wrong with your statement, it’s incredible. First, no one person speaks for all blacks in America, Jesse Jackson or otherwise. Jesse Jackson speaks for a cause(tolerance amongst all and advancement among blacks in America) that many blacks, and whites, support. Second, I don’t recall him ever making such a blanket statement, and I don’t believe he would. Third, I don’t think that most anybody who believes they control their own destiny would believe it so blindly as to not recognize the affect others can and do have on one’s life. Fourth, most black people don’t believe in ‘the white man’ as some invisible, aggregate source of oppression any more than they believe in Santa Claus, b/c most blacks have experienced racism from whites on such a personal level, on a daily basis, as to render that idea largely inaccurate. Now, did you still have a question?

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    Name : Mandi, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Baptist, Age : 21, City : Boston, State : MA Country : United States, Occupation : student, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #45482

    I simply don’t know. Some African Americans do, some African Americans don’t. Most African Americans put some blame on white America for their problems, and they are right. Others believe that all problems are caused by the white man, and that might not be far from the truth. However, we should not put the resposibility of ending racism, and helping blacks to whites. If we want to improve our conditions, we cannot rely soley upon whites to fix the problem. However, blacks cannot improve their conditions without white people because there is still so much racism in society. In order to improve, blacks have to either move out and form their own nation, or whites and blacks have to work out the problems of racism.

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    Name : Robert L. Reed, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Agnostic, Age : 17, City : St. Louis, State : MO Country : United States, Education level : Less than High School Diploma, Social class : Upper middle class, 
    #37460

    Maurice
    Participant

    1) The African-American race has no official spokesperson! Many people make the mistake of believing that outspoken, so-called ‘black leaders’ such as Jesse Jackson and Louis Farrakhan ‘represent’ the black race. This couldn’t be further from the truth. This would be the equivalent of me suggesting that David Duke represent the thoughts and views of all white people. 2) To answer your question, I think that many blacks do, indeed, still blame their misfortunes on whites. Mostly because there hasn’t been any real attempt at reconciliation for the perceived ‘misdeeds’ of the majority race. In addition, many whites still continue to reap the benefits of ‘white privilege’ in good conscious.

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    Name : Maurice, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Christian, Age : 29, City : Durham, State : NC Country : United States, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Upper class, 
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