Reverse Racism

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    Jamie
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    I have a question in regards to racism. Why does it seem, from my perspective at least, that African Americans are more focused on racism than caucasians are? For instance, there was an African American working in a department and he never did what she was supposed to, he wouldn’t show up to work and wouldn’t bother calling in, he even physically threatened the boss. He was constantly ridiculing white people and then when he was fired, he insisted it was because he wasn’t white. Honestly, I was happy he was fired and could have cared less what color he was and his race wasn’t an issue until he made it one. After that I started noticing that many African Americans have seemed much quicker to judge caucasians than caucasians are to judge African Americans. When I asked someone why, they said it was because my ancestors brought their ancestors over here and into slavery. The fact that my ancestors didn’t come to America till after slavery was abolished didn’t seem to matter to them. Why does this continue to be a reason for animosity today when slavery was abolished years ago (with the help of white people)? It doesn’t make sense to me. I am of Jewish lineage. My ancestors were slaves at one point too. I’m not going to walk around the rest of my life feeling bitter about it and I’m not going to hate the Germans or Austians for what Hitler did to my ancestors, because he was one person and you can’t base an entire race on one person’s actions. So why does it seem that many African American’s aren’t able to move beyond race issues and just start dealing with things at face value. I’m not being accusatory. I really want to understand.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Jamie, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Age : 28, City : Milwaukee, State : WI Country : United States, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Upper middle class, 
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