Proper term for dark-skinned people

Home Forums Race/Ethnicity Proper term for dark-skinned people

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #4899

    Cheryl B.
    Member

    I am an English tutor editing material obviously from the ’50s and have run across a passage stating, ‘Southern Negroes … and Northern Negroes…’ I found myself increasingly uncomfortable with these (I think) derogatory terms. What should I use in place to signify darker-complected people?

    User Detail :  

    Name : Cheryl B., Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : not religious, but believe in deity, Age : 45, City : Hilo, State : HI Country : United States, Occupation : tutor/student, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Lower middle class, 
    #36810

    Lucy22448
    Participant

    The term you should use depends on the race or ethnicity of the people to which you are refering. Refering to blacks, I would say blacks or African Americans. Negro isn’t necesarily a derogatory term, just outdated.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Lucy22448, Gender : F, Race : Hispanic/Latino (may be any race), Age : 26, City : San Jose, State : CA Country : United States, Occupation : Engineer, Education level : 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #40442

    Leory-Jones
    Participant

    Try describing them as ‘blacks with dark-skin pigmentation’.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Leory-Jones, City : los angeles, State : CA Country : United States, 
    #25753

    gloria
    Member

    Perhaps ‘people of color’ or ‘black’ would be preferred.

    User Detail :  

    Name : gloria, Gender : F, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Christian, City : Atlanta, State : GA Country : United States, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #16822

    T.R.
    Member

    What’s wrong with just saying ‘dark-skinned’?

    User Detail :  

    Name : T.R., Gender : F, Race : Black/African American, City : Newark, State : NJ Country : United States, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #25864

    William
    Member

    For ages Africans have been referred to by the color of there skin, dating back to Cush (Holy Bible New King James Version – Genesis 10:6) for reference. The name Cush (son of Ham and Noah’s grandsons) means burn or dark or black. The Bible states two sons settled in North Africa (named after Apher, a descendent of Noah) and the Middle East. Northern Africa at the time was named Cush, then renamed Ethiopia (dark or black in another language), then Upper (south) and Lower (north) Egypt. You will see that the region was named after a person whose name was based on the color of their skin.

    When the Greeks and Romans entered the region, they identified the area and its people by their color. The term Negro is Latin for black or dark; this name existed until this century. The Germans were the first to group people into racial categories (which helped them describe cultural, regional and physical characteristics – common in each category). You have Caucasians (European – geographic region), Mongoliods (Asians – geographic region), Negroes (Africans – color of skin). Here is a university that identifies the dead based on the same categories: http://www.dundee.ac.uk/forensicmedicine/llb/ident.htm#Skeletal%20remains.

    Once Europeans (Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, French and English) came to the Americas, they still described Africans as Negroes because the languages of lower Europe are Latin-based. Years later the term Negro became mispronounced in the South, especially among uneducated Southern whites (many of whom owned plantations). You can tell the levels of education between the Northerners and Southerners based on the types of industry in the respective parts of the country. The South was agrarian (farming and textile), the North was technological (factories, shipping and banking). These Southern whites would say Niggra (Ni-gra) instead of Negro (Ne-gro), and the term deteriorated even more from Negro to Nigger, a derivative of Niggra.

    I believe this is the reason you may feel uncomfortable with the term. Africans and African Americans alike have for centuries been referred to based on the color of their skin and not by a geographic region.

    User Detail :  

    Name : William, Gender : M, Race : Black/African American, Age : 29, City : Washington, State : DC Country : United States, 
    #33226

    Toni
    Member

    Black people in the South; Black people in the North.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Toni, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Christian, Age : 17, City : Las Vegas, State : NV Country : United States, Occupation : student, Education level : Less than High School Diploma, Social class : Middle class, 
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.