Mostly subtle or blunt racism today?

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  • #10862

    Alisha-R
    Participant

    I am a nursing student, and in the past several weeks we have been reading articles pertaining to race and ethnicity. There have been many articles we have studied written by African Americans stating that racism today is very subtle and that many people may make racist comments and not even know it. For example: ‘I don’t see you as being black.’ I know these statements came as a shock to me and my fellow classmates because we saw instances in which we did or said something similar to the above. My question: Does anyone else see that racism today is focused more on subtle comments, or is there still a lot of outright blunt racism?

    User Detail :  

    Name : Alisha-R, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Catholic, Age : 24, City : Kansas City, State : MO Country : United States, Education level : 4 Years of College, 
    #28901

    Terri24699
    Participant

    Racism has several forms, i.e. name-calling, and also the subtle forms. An example of this is when someone sees an African-American male approaching and they automatically assume he is a criminal, and they might walk the other way or not look at him directly in the eye. And I think the statement, ‘I don’t see you as being black’ is definitely insulting. It’s saying that a person has somehow transcended his/her race to become the so-called ‘norm’ of white. This is a racial construct, where ‘white/Caucasian’ equals ‘normal.’ I have heard comments often, as an Asian American, that I am close to ‘white.’ This also denies my existence as an Asian American. What people should do now is acknowledge that these social constructions do exist and dialogue about how they can change them. It is particularly important for whites/Caucasians because then they can realize the ways in which they might be offending people and not know it. This would be a good way to end racism – all types.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Terri24699, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Asian, City : Maplewood, State : MN Country : United States, Education level : 4 Years of College, 
    #16111

    Dan27381
    Participant

    I don’t know how many times I’ve had someone turn to me, say ‘no offense, Dan’ and then immediately say something like (insert Mexican joke, derogatory generalization or ‘ha-ha’ comment here). I also don’t know how many white people say that ‘you’re a good Hispanic’ or ‘you’re not like most Hispanics’ just because I don’t drink beer or talk loud. And then there’s the ones who accuse me of being reactionary or hypersensitive whenever I mention ‘injustice’ and ‘race’ in the same paragraph; these same cats then start griping about how minorities judge every last white person for being white. It goes on and on.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Dan27381, Gender : M, Race : Hispanic/Latino (may be any race), Religion : Pentecostal, Age : 23, City : Los Angeles, State : CA Country : United States, Occupation : Student, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Lower middle class, 
    #25977

    Mary-Z21945
    Participant

    While reading this forum I have seen many references to white people, particularly women ‘clutching their purses,’ or ‘afraid to look into the eye of a black male,’ when they encounter black males on the street. This gross generality paints all whites, particularly white females as silly, shivering, frightened, racist people when in fact didn’t the Rev. Jesse Jackson once comment he is afraid when he hears footsteps behind him on the street until he turns around and sees it’s a white person? Is Jesse a shivering, frightened, white lady or is this absurd racial stereotype pretty much a dead horse, beaten into the ground by people with an agenda?

    User Detail :  

    Name : Mary-Z21945, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Lutheran, Age : 43, City : Solon, State : OH Country : United States, Occupation : Educator, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Upper middle class, 
    #14723

    TO ME ‘I DONT SEE YOU AS BEING BLACK’ IS NOT A RACIST REMARK. I HAVE ALOT OF BLACK FRIENDS AND I TELL THEM THAT ALL THE TIME. I SEE IT AS A COMPLIMENT. I THINK THEY DO ALSO. IT TELLS SOMEONE THAT YOU SEE THEM FOR WHO THEY REALLY ARE…THAT YOU AREN’T SO SHALLOW TO JUST SEE THEM AS SOME COLOR. IT SAYS THAT YOU ARE ABLE TO LOOK BEYOND WHAT THE WORLD SEES THEM AS. IF YOU ASK ME I THINK PEOPLE ARE TOO THIN-SKINNED ABOUT THE WHOLE ‘ITS BECAUSE I’M DIFFERENT’ THING.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Emily Persaud, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Asian, Age : 14, City : Whitby, State : NA Country : Canada, Occupation : Student, Education level : Less than High School Diploma, Social class : Middle class, 
    #24159

    O. Kregg
    Participant

    I think racism is more subtle today but it’s more than just comments, it’s with apperances too. I find that most whites see their apperance as ‘normal’ since whites are the majority in America. I see it especially when looking for work, it’s extremely difficult for me to find a job simply because I have dreadlocks. I’m considered ‘unpresentable’ because I let my hair do what black hair does naturally. This is just a subtle way of saying, ‘You are unpresentable becasue you don’t look like us. Other people may find you offensive too because you don’t look like them.’ Whites may be the majority in America but it isn’t the only race here. Everyone isn’t going to look the same(most white employers that I’ve had to deal with can’t understand this fact).

    User Detail :  

    Name : O. Kregg, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Age : 23, City : Birmingham, State : AL Country : United States, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Lower class, 
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