Jewish people and Germans

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  • #10482

    Cody31991
    Participant

    Do Jewish people still have somewhat of a tension with Germans?

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    Name : Cody31991, City : Central Square, State : NY Country : United States, 
    #27177

    Emily-D
    Participant

    I am Jewish, and I don’t have any tension with Germans or any other nationality. World War II is over, and there aren’t very many Jews in Germany, so I don’t think the Germans would do anything to us in the near future.

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    Name : Emily-D, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Jewish, City : Annandale, State : VA Country : United States, Social class : Upper middle class, 
    #37560

    Denise-K
    Participant

    Yes, and in many cases, it’s more than ‘somewhat’. The reason is that the Holocaust was very recent for most of us. My grandmother, for instance, lost ALL her family in the Holocaust. She was the sole survivor. Thanks to this, I exist. The germans did not consider german jews to be germans, even though many gave their lives for germany in World War I. That ungratefulness hurt. Therefore, today there are many jews, including german-born, that will not buy german products for example or have anything to do with germany. Anyhow, I know that today’s generations of germans have nothing to do with the stupidity that swept the nation decades ago, but many more decades must pass before the wounds totally heal.

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    Name : Denise-K, Gender : F, Race : Hispanic/Latino (may be any race), Religion : Jewish, Age : 15, City : Caracas, State : NA Country : Venezuela, Occupation : student, Education level : Less than High School Diploma, Social class : Upper middle class, 
    #29141

    LP
    Member

    I can’t generalize, but I certainly don’t have any tension with Germans (I presume regarding the Holocaust). I’ve met many german jews, and of course that’s not an issue there. And I’ve met plenty of non-jewish Germans, and of the ones I talked about such things with (certainly not an everyday occurrance) if anything they seemed to be quite well educated about what happened and to feel a bit guilty about the whole thing, as much as people can feel guilty about the previous generation’s behavior.

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    Name : LP, Gender : M, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Jewish, Age : 40, City : New Yor, State : NY Country : United States, Education level : 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #15182

    Michael20689
    Participant

    Keep in mind that many Jewish folk persecuted in Hitler’s regime *were* German — take Einstein, who was always more comfortable speaking in his native German.

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    Name : Michael20689, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : bi-curious (mostly straight), Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Agnostic, Age : 20, City : Livingston, State : LA Country : United States, Occupation : undergrad, Education level : 2 Years of College, 
    #40154

    Robin29586
    Participant

    As a Jew, I do not have anything against Germans per se, but have absolutely zero interest in going to Germany. It’s just a creepy feeling I get. But I personally do not feel any tension with Germans.

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    Name : Robin29586, Religion : Jewish, City : Boston, State : MA Country : United States, 
    #36853

    Coolcat32019
    Participant

    I hope that one day a people won’t have to pay for the past crimes of one group, but there are still many Jews that harbor mistrust and hatred for Germans, my mother is one of them. We have had many discussions on the subject and I feel that even after such as terrible crime as the Holicaust it is better to let go of hatred. What should come out of it is a renewed vigilance against all forms of racism. However I am another generation removed from those who suffered during that time. For that reason I have patience with my mother and grandparent’s negative views towards Germans despite my personal feelings. I understand that for them the tragedy is much too close and it is easy to give into hatred.

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    Name : Coolcat32019, City : Toronna, State : NA Country : Canada, 
    #35979

    Mike Urciolo
    Participant

    I lived in Wuerzburg Germany for 3 years, and traveled extensively in Bavaria. I met quite a few of them, and most of them accepted me warmly. Sometimes, the acceptance was simply because I was an American, other times because they simply seemed to like me. And then there were others who didn’t like me at all simply because I was an American. The younger Germans (35 years or younger) still talked about the Holocaust and were apologetic for the role their elders played in it. On the other hand, the Neo-Nazi party in Germany has a problem with all Foreigners, which means anyone who is not German. They are to be found more in Northern Germany in cities like Berlin. I was a little nervous about moving there because of the unknown and becuase I didn’t speak German, but they made me feel welcome quickly. The had German-American fests and walks so that the two cultures could learn from each other. And by the way – German food is some of the best I’ve ever tasted in the world!

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    Name : Mike Urciolo, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Age : 56, City : Naples, State : NA Country : Italy, Occupation : Communications Tech, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #26474

    Eli25299
    Participant

    My family is Jewish, and on one side of my family my grandfather actually fought in World War II. The other side of my family lived in the Warsaw ghetto and escaped Poland only weeks before Nazi troops invaded their home. Jews of my generation and my parents’ generation have no hatred toward Germans now; the KKK are much closer to home. However, i can say that my grandfather and my Jewish friends’ grandfathers probably wouldn’t buy a German vehicle.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Eli25299, Gender : M, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Jewish, Age : 17, City : Chicago, State : IL Country : United States, Social class : Upper class, 
    #26036

    Jeff31192
    Participant

    Interestingly, Israel has excellent trade relations with Germany. Germany has taken many actions to repair the damages from the holocaust, and both countries recognize a good trade partner when they see one.

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    Name : Jeff31192, City : Hartford, State : CT Country : United States, 
    #31261

    funlab
    Member

    this is obviously a question that can only be answered in generalities and everyone has their own opinion on this one. i can’t stand to hear the german language because it brings up such a strong connection for me to the nazis. on of my dearest friends is german and lives in munich. we had a long talk about this one night and it was quite enlightening. germans of my generation feel a lot of shame related to the nazis. however there is still a strong feeling of anti-semitism that still exists, obviously nothing that would rise to the level of nazism. so, i would answer your question with a yes. we’ll never forget what happpened, but hopefully in time we’ll forgive and then ultimately seperate the horrors the nazis committed from the current generations that had nothing to do with it.

    User Detail :  

    Name : funlab, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Jewish, Age : 40, City : Chicago, State : IL Country : United States, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Upper middle class, 
    #26920

    Eric
    Member

    My Grandmother who was liberated from Aushwitz has resentment toward Germany, but not towards Germans in general. The fact that Germany has supported Israel since the end of WWII has won it many points in the eyes of the Jewish community. As for Jews who where not victims of the Holocaust (or their decendants/relatives), I have never seen then have any problems getting along with Germans. I know that I don’t have any tension when talking with Germans.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Eric, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Jewish, Age : 17, City : Denver, State : CO Country : United States, Education level : Less than High School Diploma, Social class : Upper middle class, 
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