Is it changeable?

Home Forums Race/Ethnicity Is it changeable?

Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #10554

    SR28466
    Participant

    I’ve moved back to my hometown, a ‘minority majority’ city in which the Chicano population outnumbers the Caucasian population. I’ve met up with an old friend (who is white), and it seems like we might get together romantically. What really bothers me, though, is that every time I’ve spoken with him since returning to our hometown, he’s made derogatory comments about ‘those Mexicans’ in kind of hushed, confidential tones, like he expects me to agree with him (which I definitely don’t). Has anyone had any experience trying to change someone’s racist views, or has anyone gotten romantically involved with someone like this? What was your experience like?

    User Detail :  

    Name : SR28466, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Humanist, Age : 23, City : San Antonio, State : TX Country : United States, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, 
    #13863

    Dan31670
    Participant

    L.A. is pretty much the epitome of a minority majority city. However, there are many people who are uneasy about it, and the vast majority of them happen to be white. L.A. used to be a conservative, mostly white town where Latinos and others were sectioned-off minorities, and now it’s liberal and about 70% non-white. A lot of those who object to this hearken back to the old days of L.A. and they really feel that it isn’t the same at all. Every problem imagineable is blamed on Latinos and others in the letters-to-the-editor section in the newspapers. However, the minorities here are thrilled about the change, and many are hopeful as to what the future shall bring in regards to opportunity, culture and multiculturalism. Essentially it’s a changing of the guard, and its almost understandable how the old guard would be leery or even hostile over it. However, I also believe that many of these objections are rooted in bigotry (realized or unrealized) and even in ‘northern racism.’ I would suggest you ask your friend why he objects to ‘those Mexicans’ and to state everything he finds objectionable. Most of these objections are probably overblown or are rooted in misunderstanding, and if you do your homework (reliable facts and figures, speak with a Chican@ friend about it, etc.) you can probably set him straight; however, there is always the possibility that he could very well be a bigot.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Dan31670, Gender : M, Race : Hispanic/Latino (may be any race), Religion : Pentecostal, Age : 22, City : L.A., State : CA Country : United States, Occupation : Student, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Lower middle class, 
    #32430

    Colleen32003
    Participant

    I met a guy who told me that only blacks had ‘curb finders’ on their cars. I don’t believe anything of a group so I thought that comment was tooooo riduculous! Every time we went out together I kept my eye out for ‘curb finders.’ Some of them were on blacks cars…but there were quite a few on whites’ too. I made jokes about it and he finally conceded. He never made another prejudice remark to me and we’ve been married 17 years. I don’t think that he’s prejudice, I think it was the people he was brought up around. He’s in the military and getting away from home exposed him to a more integrated world. When we went to his relatives’ homes, I heard an occasional prejudice remark, but I objected. I let them all know that we wouldn’t come back if they made those remarks – especially if it was around my children.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Colleen32003, Gender : F, Age : 40, City : Quantico, State : VA Country : United States, Occupation : Teacher's aide, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #26611

    Nelson-A20170
    Participant

    I’ve been in a similar situation. What worked for me was just going over some historical facts, such as who were where first. In Texas it’s easy, first were ‘those mexicans’ then came the Spanish conquerors and finally, centuries later, the anglo-europeans, such as the ancestors of your friend. Let him know, and let anyone else know that when the anglo-europeans came to what is now America, the people that were already here didn’t ask them for visas, green cards or asked them to ‘learn the language’, and they should be aware that the Mayflower was in fact a refugee ship carrying a bunch of immigrants. That usually puts people in their place. It’s worked for me.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Nelson-A20170, Gender : M, Race : White/Caucasian, Age : 31, City : Caracas, State : NA Country : Venezuela, Occupation : lawyer/business, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, 
Viewing 4 posts - 1 through 4 (of 4 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.