How do Child Protection workers sleep at night?

Home Forums Occupation How do Child Protection workers sleep at night?

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #2298

    Mark S.
    Member

    For anyone who works for Child Protective Services: How can you justify your job? What is the point of saving a few kids from abuse, while damaging the lives of so many other families by your interference, or even by your mere existence, given the tacit threat of your inflated authority?

    User Detail :  

    Name : Mark S., Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Gay, Race : White/Caucasian, Age : 31, City : Houston, State : TX Country : United States, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #29262

    Meadow
    Participant

    Have you had experience with child protection workers? I think it is largely a Hollywood stereotype that child protection workers come rip children from their families – it makes a good movie plot. In reality, these people, who get paid very little for all of the hard work they put it into their jobs, do a lot of good. They sleep at night because they know that they are devoting their lives to people who often have no defense of their own. Let’s face it: People are not perfect. And a lot of these far-from-perfect people are having kids – hitting them, abusing them, etc. This happens – I know from personal experience. So I think it’s about time we give child protection workers the appreciation and respect they deserve. It takes a special person to forgo the big bucks other jobs offer and pour out so much of their heart and soul to make sure children aren’t being beaten, aren’t being abused and are treated as human beings.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Meadow, Gender : F, Race : Asian/Caucasian, Religion : Agnostic, Age : 20, City : Sarasota, State : FL Country : United States, Education level : 2 Years of College, 
    #17802

    like all people, there are well intended ones, and control freaks. i have the misfortune/fortune of working regularly with them and have had a mix of good to horrific experiences. there really are cases where they do rip families apart and when they work along their own agenda. some of them lie, try to control therapy for victims, and actively sabotage family’s chances for getting back together. sometimes they ride high on the power and threaten people. one i have recently been working with has tried to get me fired for speaking up about unethical behavior. that system can be so corrupt. on the other hand, some have saved children’s lives. i wouldnt want to do the job and if i could i would avoid working with that system altogether.

    User Detail :  

    Name : pissedkitty, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : 1/2 native, 1/2 white, Age : 39, City : Caribou, State : ME Country : United States, Occupation : psychotherapist, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #29539

    Kita
    Participant

    This was my experience: I worked for a while in the system after graduating with my bachelor’s in social work degree. The No. 1 thing we were told over and over was to do everything possible to keep the family together (even in cases of incest and certain cases of clear abuse, etc). Someone’s life had to pretty much be in clear danger before upheaving anyone’s life. However, I found that only one other caseworker in my division had a social work degree and training. Everyone else had degrees in math, business and totally unrelated educations and had completely different and many times aggressive ways of tackling problems. Many couldn’t empathize and see the whole picture and felt our social work techniques were too permissive and let the parents walk all over us. The pay is bad ($20,000 a year in my case, and my degree was in the field). You’re always on the front lines, so you’re associated with being the bad guy. There’s lack of respect or prestige for the job, and you constantly butt your head against the wall with many people who make Jerry Springer guests look normal. Many judges didn’t have a solid knowledge of family dynamics (they’re more likely to specialize in law-related issues) but they made the final decision.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Kita, Gender : F, City : Orlando, State : FL Country : United States, 
    #14412

    Melissa
    Member

    When i was 16…my brother, sister and I were taken from my family only because we lived in a hotel and my father was an alcoholic. We were never beaten, not even spanked. We always had food and my father and mother were constantly caring and loving parents.We were never deprived of love !! Then…we were taken away to live in a red-neck town with a screwed up family in a trailor. The family we lived with only used foster children for money and ‘slaves’. All of us had to clean up after them daily, watch the kids THEY were paid to babysit, and at the end of the day, if we were finished with our ‘chores’ we would beg and plead to take a walk. If we were granted our wish…we were allowed to walk down the driveway and back.And if we were lucky we could walk to the stop sign and back. While they ate mcdonalds or what not for dinner…we had 3 day old potato soup. We constanly had head lice because with the many children going in and out…it was hard to get rid of. The foster parents never hurt us…but instead were emotionally unavailable. I missed my parents all the time. Sometimes there would be weeks when i didn’t see them. it’s very hard to go from being hugged all the time, taking a shower when you feel like it, or going outside or in the refrigerator without having to ask or even beg… to being so confined. All i wondered when i was there was…what did ‘I’ do wrong? Why did ‘they’ bring me here? i was only there for one year…but it was a hard, long year. and to this day…i haven’t forgiven the system !!

    User Detail :  

    Name : Melissa, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : nazarene, Age : 20, City : Jacksonville, State : FL Country : United States, Occupation : server, Education level : High School Diploma, 
Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.