Handicapped placards and public perceptions

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Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)
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  • #6833

    Larry
    Member

    I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s Disease two years ago and sometimes have trouble walking because of it. However, when my medication is working well, there is almost no sign of the disease. Still, the medication can wear off in the space of a few minutes.

    I am considering getting a handicapped placard for my car, but am slightly concerned I will get dirty looks and questions if I am in one of my “on” periods and use the placard. If the medication wasn’t so volatile and didn’t wear off so quickly, I could use the placard only during my “off” periods. But I do not feel it would be wise to do so, since my “off” periods can come suddenly. Is this something I should worry about? Do people consider that a disabled person may not be visibly disabled, or that it may not be a full-time disability?

    User Detail :  

    Name : Larry, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Gay, Disability : Parkinson's Disease, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Presbyterian, Age : 36, City : New York, State : NY Country : United States, Occupation : Network Administrator, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #37197

    Joel
    Member

    My mother has CFIDS and has gotten the state-approved placard. I have seen people give her dirty looks, and I’ve seen people be very understanding (CFIDS is rarely visible to observers).

    My opinion: People are going to react to you according to their own notions of what “disabled” means, but if I see you with it in a “handicapped” parking spot, I’m going to assume you feel it’s justified, regardless of my initial reaction.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Joel, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Atheist, Age : 21, City : Boulder, State : CO Country : United States, Occupation : Software Engineer, Education level : High School Diploma, Social class : Middle class, 
    #29707

    Laura26064
    Participant

    If you feel you need a placard, by all means get one. If I see someone who is not visibly disabled but has a placard, I am not going to question the necessity of their having one. (What I do object to is someone without a placard parking in a handicapped spot.) If you have a legitimate reason for a placard, don’t worry about what other people think. If you need one, you need one, and you don’t owe anyone an explanation.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Laura26064, Gender : F, Race : White/Caucasian, Age : 37, City : Bel Air, State : MD Country : United States, Occupation : College professor, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #36642

    Jim30733
    Participant

    If I were you, I would be more concerned about what could happen if your medication were to wear off while you were driving. Don’t worry about what people think.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Jim30733, Gender : M, City : Scio, State : OR Country : United States, 
    #35279

    P. Sang
    Participant

    I’m color-blind, partly. Nobody knows if I don’t tell them. One time I talked about it to my girlfriend, and sometime later she left me. Even though I’m not sure it was because of my disability, I have never talked about it to anybody. I think there are many disabilities that can’t be seen. I believe that observable disabilities are only small ones. You don’t have to worry. Keep your faith.

    User Detail :  

    Name : P. Sang, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Asian, Religion : Presbyterian, Age : 35, City : East Lansing, State : MI Country : United States, Occupation : Grad student, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #27813

    Ruth29514
    Participant

    I have had a handicapped placard for several years. Often I don’t look like I “need” one. I get dirty looks, or comments from people who are clueless. I try to respond when appropriate, educating those who need it (what does pain look like? How can you determine if walking hurts for me? It took my doctor extensive tests and x-rays to determine this. Did you know arthritis can strike at any age?). I think that it’s good to help educate the public about the ups and downs of disabilities. If there is non-handicapped parking available and I’m having a “good” day (which can change rapidly), I’ll use it. If there are multiple handicapped spots available and some have better van access than others, I try to leave the best van access for those who need it. Ultimately, I know I need it, and that’s what counts.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Ruth29514, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Disability : Arthritis, Race : Asian, Religion : Christian, Age : 36, City : Denver, State : CO Country : United States, Occupation : Senior Business Analyst, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #41001

    DeAnne
    Member

    Larry, I can understand and relate to what you are going through. I, too, have a “hidden” disability – a heart condition that makes it difficult for me to walk far. I have had a handicapped parking card about 12 years. I do get some stares, but it is definitely worth it to go out and be able to get things done without worrying if you will be too tired or fall down, etc. I can’t use stairs, and I get looks when I use the elevators to go up or down one flight. I have learned to ignore it. You should get one if you are eligible; as I see it, it is worth it.

    User Detail :  

    Name : DeAnne, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Disability : Congenital heart defect, Race : White/Caucasian, Age : 35, City : Springfield, State : IL Country : United States, Occupation : Data input operator, Education level : 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #17380

    Chris
    Member

    Don’t sweat it. If you need the sticker, get it. After all, not all medical conditions are visible and easily recognized. If someone makes a commment, it shows their lack of understanding.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Chris, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Arabic, Religion : Catholic, Age : 33, City : Warren, State : MI Country : United States, Occupation : Programmer, Education level : 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
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