Chris-A

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  • in reply to: Why did Christians vote for Donald Trump? #80928

    Chris-A
    Participant

    Wow Lawrence. I’m sorry that you are not pleased with the election outcome. I am Christian and did vote for Trump. I did vote for President Obama before and have no problem saying I did. At the end of the day, I will speak for myself and say there are a few who believe as you say, but not the majority.

    I have a child with a disability and saw what Trump did in mockery. As a Christian I don’t agree with it at all. I have had to fight for acceptance and rights from day one. At the same time, I had to vote for the candidate who could change things that I cannot. I will continue to advocate for my daughter, and yes, it pisses me off that he did and said what he did. But every single presidential candidate says a whole bunch of things and promises a ton. Every single presidential candidate lies. All we can do now is continue being upstanding good Americans. In four years, we will see where we stand.

    Believe me, the things I saw on both sides of the campaign from both candidates … If I were either one of their parents, they’d be grounded!

    User Detail :  

    Name : Chris-A, Gender : Male, Race : Hispanic, Age : 54, City : Portland, State : OR Country : United States, 
    in reply to: Southern women #32955

    Chris-A
    Participant

    Sadly, you are somewhat correct in your perceptions. Having lived in the Deep South for several years, I can attest to the “male-centered” culture you refer to, and saw with my own eyes the “sugar-coated magnolia” stereotypes with their fussy hairstyles and high heels.

    Definitely, the South is a separate culture from the rest of the United States, and while you’ll find occasional feminist and progressive thinking, most of the people I knew were strongly influenced by their regional culture, more so than in other regions of the country. Southern people hold onto a strong sense of history, and perhaps it is that which holds them back from the sweeping cultural change that moves across places such as California. Many Southerners still feel separate from the rest of the country, not to mention resentful over the Civil War. As long as Southern people cling to the past and remain separate from the rest of us, I feel they will not progress culturally. Perhaps sympathy is not the response you should feel, but rather to focus on the fascination. One who has been raised immersed in such a culture is not as oppressed and unhappy as you might think, and the borders in and out of the Southern states are not closed. Simply be glad you don’t live there. When they’re ready, Southern women can find their own way to progressive lifestyles.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Chris-A, Gender : Male, Race : Hispanic, Age : 54, City : Portland, State : OR Country : United States, 
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