'Aks' versus 'Ask'

Home Forums Race/Ethnicity 'Aks' versus 'Ask'

This topic contains 8 replies, has 9 voices, and was last updated by  Melissa28586 5 years, 2 months ago.

Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #2283

    FreedaBee
    Member

    Why do so many black people say ‘aks’ instead of ‘ask’ or pronounce words ending in ‘th’ like they end in ‘f’ (‘I’ll go ask Keith’ becomes ‘I’ll go aks Keef’)? It doesn’t seem to be tied to any particular segment of the black population. That is, it’s not just people from the South or a certain age group or those above/below a specific education or socio-economic level. I know it can be hard to break a speech pattern that you’ve grown up with, but why would you want to purposely mispronounce a word when you know how it really sounds? I mean, I grew up saying ‘basghetti’ and ‘liberry’ but I don’t still do it.

    • This topic was modified 4 years, 5 months ago by  admin.

    User Detail :  

    Name : FreedaBee, Gender : Female, Sexual Orientation : Lesbian, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Agnostic, Age : 42, City : Orange County, State : CA Country : United States, Occupation : Analyst, Education level : 4 Years of College, Social class : Upper middle class, 
    #44655

    Ann L. Lowenstein
    Participant

    Welcome to the wide world of ‘Ebonics.’ blacks who speak that way generally do so because they’ve been socialized by their ‘cultural leaders’ to believe that their illiterate ghetto slang is a ‘language’ which is ‘unique to the Afcayan-‘Maycayan ekpeerans’, and that to speak normal standard English makes them ‘race traitors.’ Blacks who don’t buy into that horsecrap speak pretty much like anyone else.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Ann L. Lowenstein, Gender : F, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Animist, Age : 37, City : K.C., State : MO Country : United States, Occupation : Administrative Assistant, Education level : 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #39918

    Jalissa-&-Charles
    Participant

    We feel as though as long as people understand what we are saying, it doesnt matter how we say it.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Jalissa-&-Charles, Age : 18, City : Chicago, State : IL Country : United States, 
    #32712

    Daniel
    Member

    African Americans first learned to speak American as slaves, Slaves taught the new slaves. Since this was not our native tongue, we learned the language incorrectly. This mispronunciation is continued from our childhood on unless we make the effort to speak correctly.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Daniel, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Christian, Age : 45, City : Johnson City, State : TN Country : United States, Occupation : Self-employed, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Lower middle class, 
    #44697

    Melissa28586
    Participant

    You are describing characterisics of African American Vernacular English. Just as ‘Standard American English’ has set grammatical rules, so does AAVE. There have been countless studies done on the subject. Check out Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_American_Vernacular_English

    User Detail :  

    Name : Melissa28586, Gender : F, Race : White/Caucasian, Age : 24, City : Fargo, State : ND Country : United States, Occupation : College Instructor, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, 
    #22572

    David
    Member

    I’ve wondered about that, too. I have notice the tendency much less with educated black people. Do white people do anything similar?

    User Detail :  

    Name : David, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : White/Caucasian, Religion : Christian, Age : 38, City : Nashville, State : TN Country : United States, Occupation : Trainer, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #24193

    John S.
    Member

    Most black people talk the way that they do because of the very reason that you pointed out: they grew up with that particular speech pattern. People tend to stay together in their own racially and culturally unified groups. If a black person is around other black people most of the time, then that black person may never feel a need to change the pronunciation of word since other black people probably won’t have difficulty understanding it. As an interesting historical note, in Middle English, the word ‘ask’ actually was pronounced ‘aks’; you can find examples of this in untranslated works by Geoffrey Chaucer.

    User Detail :  

    Name : John S., Gender : Male, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : 75% white, 25% Asian, Religion : Atheist, Age : 24, City : Lake Charles, State : LA Country : United States, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Lower class, 
    #36936

    Jim
    Participant

    study diction and regional speech patterns. Most Black folks migrated from the south so since we tend to be raised in households with southern speech patterns then we tend to speak that way as well.

    User Detail :  

    Name : Jim, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : African Methodist Episcopalian, Age : 32, City : jones, State : OH Country : United States, Occupation : Tax accountant, Education level : Over 4 Years of College, Social class : Middle class, 
    #32167

    Brad
    Member

    a slight mixture of dialect with a LOT of ignorance. The same reason a lot of (mostly) white people come to my job and ‘ASK’ about inkjet ‘cartilages’ instead of ‘cartridges’ and ‘UBS’ instead of ‘USB’ Cables. Also, it’s possible that no one has tried to correct them, and now MIGHT not be a good time!

    User Detail :  

    Name : Brad, Gender : M, Sexual Orientation : Straight, Race : Black/African American, Religion : Christian, Age : 33, City : Winchester, State : VA Country : United States, Occupation : Computer Tech, Education level : 2 Years of College, Social class : Lower middle class, 
Viewing 9 posts - 1 through 9 (of 9 total)

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.